Reputaige is Restaurant Reputation management

Reputation marketing specialists – Reputiage Reputation Marketing-  announces that reputation management is no longer just another option to restaurant businesses.

        In fact, in the world of modern marketing this kind of brand reinforcement has become an absolute necessity.

Reputiage marketing company was born out of the growing need for local Restauteurs to not only manage their reputation but market their business through better Social Media venue communications with customers: past, present and future.

A great online reputation can have a huge impact on a company’s revenue. When researchers at the Harvard Business School analyzed restaurant reviews and revenue in Seattle they found that a one-star increase on the popular review site Yelp meant a five to nine per cent increase in revenue for independent restaurants. And it’s not just restaurants that are affected it’s just about every business that deals directly with the public.

One thing that has been made clear is that reputation management no longer optional for restaurants that deal directly with the public. The internet has empowered consumers today in a way that has never been seen before enabling them to reach out to your potential customers in real time and on gathering passions making it impossible for businesses to succeed without some form of reputation management and comprehensive sustained marketing efforts.

Now-a-days you have to operate and encourage customers to post their opinions and complaints on business-review and social media sites. Your company’s success or failure in large part hinges on the effect that your current online management of your reputation to encourage others to buy your product or indulge in your specialty services. Shoppers today want to know that you have a good business reputation according to what others say about you to ensure they are making a wise purchase decision….this is why the word managed reputation is a segment of any mangers daily repertoire. Technology has empowered the consumer to review your performance and blast it in front of the entire world and, only the use of technology will insure you respond appropriately.

You should suggest to your favorite customers to leave positive reviews. This is only a small part of what is required for a restaurant business to succeed today. You need to monitor reviews and respond quickly to those that are negative. In order to do this you need a system to monitor review sites and make you aware of claims for or against your reputation. You need to make sure the good reviews outweighs the bad on all review sites. The way to do that is to promote the publication of positive reviews across all the reviewing blogs and websites for our industry.

 

Reputiage makes a similarly impossible task less tiresome with the use of the right technology.

 

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The Social Changes in Dining Habits

Chef Michael Bennett tells what we should expect for the future of our Food Business The Social Changes in Dining Habits

When you think about it, we will never dine again like we did a decade ago.

  • With the generational gap between the 70’s counter culture people – the Boomers – that demanded uber-chic foods from their restaurants in the 1980’s – to today’s diners – the Y-generation that has lived through multiple economic down-turns and a social revolution over the past two decades; our current dining clientele have no idea what opulent dining should be.

PRICE POINT, INSTANT SERVICE THE GOAL

The dining populace today is looking for dwindling prices and bold flavors. They are not looking for superior products that are well thought-out in rich visual appeal; it has to be instantaneous and scrumptious without drawn-out service attributes. The dining public that insisted on a 2½ hour dining experience is long gone. Those people are now investing their disposable income on supporting their aging parents, instead of treating themselves to an evening of culinary bliss.

There is one avenue in culinary field that is growing in affluence and totality: the gourmet food market segment. Companies such as Wild Oats, Whole Foods and The Fresh Market continue to grow, and are more popular today than anyone could have imagined in the beginning of the 1990s.

It’s the result of the Boomers treating themselves to superlative foods at home, rather than going out for fine dining. Their teen-age kids are being brought up expecting that this the norm. This procurement practice learned before they leave to go to college seems like it will transverse to the next generation unlike, fine dining of the 1980’s.

ARE THEY THE FUTURE?

Gourmet markets flaunting the highest quality cheeses from Europe, olive oils from around the Mediterranean, prime-aged meats and fresh locally harvested seafood abound in and around South Florida. Home-grown gourmet markets budded from long-standing family-owned local food markets. These markets over the decades saw that as their clientele gained esteem through their occupations, so did their need to live prodigiously at home. Coupled with the lack of formal dining out of the home and the need to still treat oneself, metropolitan gourmet markets flourish.

Look across the Southern United States, where retiring Boomers are now settling for a quite retirement from the rat race and you can see there is an increasing demand for gourmet and time-saving prepared food markets. Looking across Florida, Arizona and Texas, gourmet markets like: Epicure, Norman Brother’s, Gardener’s (all in Miami), Fernanda’s and Doris markets in Fort Lauderdale and Carmine’s of Palm Beach, Rice Epicurean and Eatzies in Houston and Dallas, Central Market in San Antonio, Texas, AJ’s fine foods in Phoenix, have been blossoming in popularity and scope.

I can remember going shopping downtown to the only place in Fort Lauderdale that sells deCecco pasta, Fernando’s, with my grandmother in the 1970’s. This is the way it starts for generational cooking at home. The Boomers have already indoctrinated their college aged kids to expect these markets to fulfill their needs for their future.

BOOMERS RETIRE, BUT THEIR TASTES DON’T

It has been a long journey for the family markets but, this segment is expanding faster than most other segment of the food service spectrum.

“We have seen the growth in sales rise ever since the Boomers started to retire”, a gourmet store manager told me. In the Tampa and Sarasota area of the Florida’s West Coast, there is up and coming places like Morton’s that have broken away from the mom and pop attitude to roasted-in-house gourmet coffee beans, supply in-house prepared entire Home Meal Replacements, dedicate a major part of the floor space to European cheeses and charcuteire that until recently unattainable in most of the United States.

A NEW SOCIAL SCENE

A newly unexpected social scene for Boomers occur at these gourmet markets. Not only do people linger long at their favorite markets, purchasing specialty foods for dinner, shopping has become a see-and-be-seen sport. It has become universal rationale to go to your favorite gourmet market to spend the afternoon socializing with friends. Today’s Boomer social customs have changed from the “Me generation” to the “We generation”.

The Internet and these markets are now the new siscos for the We Generation. We all want to be interconnected with others, it’s a social thing. The We society as a whole went through many stages.

First it was TV, then cable and i’s broadcasting of specific aspects of the social realm. Cable news brought us together as a country. Thanks to CNN, we know as much of what is happening in California and New York as around the city in which we live. MTV quickly spread to young Americans the urban sounds that they never would have heard locally in their own rural part of the country.

The rapid spread of cable’s cooking shows have led us to become food voyeurs, watching shows and their hosts that we would have previously would only have known from reading their cookbooks. No one has to look far for lessons on any food subject.

Now, the Internet has become the No. 1 outlet for information and our new interconnect-ability.

In the digital world, everyone can be a star as long as they can reach a dedicated viewership. Our Boomer community feels this immediacy brings more inter-connectivity on a personal basis while scanning their favorite sites. By opting-in to blogs and YouTube videos specific to our own wants, the social inter-connection is growing stronger. We can choose to interact with other cooks online, or watch favorites from our computers now sitting on our kitchen counters.

It’s a new age in dining – and where will the next generation get its food information? Time will tell.

* * *

Chef Michael Bennett is chef at the Bimini Boatyard in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and is the author of In the Land of Misfits, Pirates and Cooks, Underneath a Cloudless Sky and Culture of Cuisine.

The digital marketing aspect of Restaurants

Seen on <http://hospitalitytechnology.edgl.com/news/Lodging-Interactive-Expands-Reputation-Management—Social-Media-Marketing-to-Restaurants98914>

The digital marketing aspect of promoting a restaurant can often be a secondary thought. But creating the same intimate, casual or fine dining experience on social media that can be expected at a restaurant is essential to standing out in an industry of numerous options, typically searched for with little lead time and often sought out by location and via mobile device.

If resources are limited, and they almost always are, the two areas restaurateurs should concentrate on are social media channels and responding to reviews.

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Social Media Presence:
Accounts on large social sites including Facebook and Twitter may seem obvious, but less obvious platforms can also assist in raising awareness of a restaurant. Consider image-centric platforms such as Instagram and Pinterest to showcase quality images of dishes or share recipes as well as video-based channels like YouTube and Vine to offer a “behind the scenes” look.

Establishing these accounts is just one piece of the pie. Regularly scheduled postings that share specials and discounts as well as local write-ups and upcoming events will help to gain the following restaurants desire for long-term success. A restaurant’s following is found by posting information on social media, but it is maintained and flourishes by posting quality content that does not always sell.

Not only will followers be given a glimpse of a restaurant’s style, cuisine and philosophy on social, but it also provides a platform for your customers to post quality content on a restaurant’s behalf. Encourage diners to share their experience and they’ll quickly become social media champions. Considering that 49% of people use Facebook when searching for restaurants, the positive buzz on social media can be more influential than your most strategically placed, thoughtfully targeted ads.

Restaurant Reviews & Online Reputation:
Social media lets patrons informally share their take on a restaurant with their followers, with Facebook reviews going a step further by putting this feedback directly on a restaurant’s page. Review sites like Yelp and Urbanspoon are resources for diners searching for where to eat, when to eat or even a particular cuisine. They provide information like price point, menu and location, details that are essential to the decision-making process for the mobile user, 95% of which conduct restaurant searches. These sites are also home to positive and negative feedback from guests that is considered just as trustworthy as a personal recommendation by 79% of consumers. Reviews, however, have the potential to be far more impactful based on their considerably greater reach than traditional word of mouth.

Consider these statistics:
53% of 18- to 34-year-olds report that online reviews factor into their dining decisions.
58% of consumers searched restaurant ratings online in 2014, making it the top-searched industry.
A one-star increase in a Yelp rating leads to a 5 to 9% increase in revenue.

Managing these reviews should be a priority. Negative reviews are opportunities to reach out and connect not only to the reviewer, but the greater audience of readers. Address positive and negative feedback and monitor business listings for reviews that violate site guidelines. Restaurateurs need to be aware of what is being said about their business online and have a process in place to look into reviewers’ comments and respond accordingly.

Lodging Interactive’s CoMMingle for Restaurants can create and execute an innovative social media and reputation management strategy customized for your restaurant. The experienced digital marketing strategists that provide solutions for hotels will cultivate your restaurant’s online presence.

Through its CoMMingle Social Media Marketing Agency operating division, the company offers hospitality focused and fully managed outsourced hotel social media marketing customized solutions. In addition the company offers Social Voices, the hospitality industry’s first 24/7/365 day a year Social Customer Care service (www.socialvoices.com).