Gluten Free cookbook Author Chef Michael Bennett produces another Neo-Tropical cookbook

Losing weight while eating deliciously.

 

Gluten Free cookbook Author Chef Michael Bennett produces another Neo-Tropical cookbook.

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These Summer Cookbooks Will Make the Good Life Even Better ~because they are healthy recipe books.

June 09,

Summer cookbooks are fanciful creatures — high on whimsy and shamelessly devoted to making a good life better. For some that means lingering in the farmers markets or gardening with the kids. For others it’s indulging in some usually forbidden pleasures —the icy sweet, the charred and fishy. And for some, it means crossing oceans to sample less familiar fare — without ever leaving the porch. There’s something for everyone, but all go just fine with bare toes and a sun hat.

 

Marinades

The Quick-Fix Way to Turn Everyday Food into Exceptional Fare, With 400 Recipes
by Lucy Vaserfirer

Paperback, 320 pages

marinades
Cookbook of Marinades

Ah, the glow of the charcoal! the ring of the tongs! The romance of grilling may center around a Weber kettle, but some of its most powerful secrets lie in a zip-top bag. Marinades offers page after page of simple, devastatingly effective baths — and just in case you’re not so sure what to do with your Madeira-Thyme Marinade once you’ve got it — afterward points you in the direction of some nice veal rib chops or other appropriate cuts. Lucy Vaserfirer knows that for all the fire and flair at the end, the success of a grilling adventure often starts hours before, with the silent, humble art of wet baths and dry rubs. Chops and medallions, steaks and kebabs — there’s hardly a cut of protein that doesn’t benefit from a good long soak in an emphatically-seasoned liquid. Five minutes of forethought while you’re cleaning up from lunch is all it takes. After that, deliciousness is in the bag. Meanwhile, you can go for a bit of a soak yourself.

 

All Natural SURF Cuisine

A Study in Seafood Cookery
by Michael Bennett

Paperback, 186 pages

 

All Natural Surf Cuisine
An all natural SURF cuisine by Chef Michael Bennett

You will love how the Chef’s narratives are paired up with the recipes. It was like reading a recipe guide and journal from this chef on his journey through cooking seafood. You will also like the idea that the book is broken up into segments like; spices, salads, sauces and entrees. So, besides having 100 or more recipes squeezed into 188 pages, you actually get a multiple of at least 3 times that much if you interchange the sub-recipes into the entree section. This book is of course featuring healthy cooking of Seafood. Since it is a tropical seafood natural cooking cookbook you expect that but, it is also a GLUTEN FREE cookbook. The chef explains that the recipes are mostly grilled so the need for adding wheat flour is not needed. Chef Michael Bennett goes out of his way to create sauces that are as healthy as they are exotic – to pair with the grilled seafood. Once you investigate the recipes you’ll see that this book might be your favorite cookbook for your weekend family dinners.

 

The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Vegetable Cookbook

100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden
by Brent Ridge, Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Sandy Gluck

Hardcover, 275 pages

 

Natural veggie cookbook
Vegetables cookbook

The “lifestyle company” Beekman 1802 celebrates the better bits of farm life (fresh eggs and rustic antiques, not manure spreaders and drought). This third Beekman cookbook outing is suffused with nostalgic, agrarian spirit, from its seed-packet endpapers to its fluted-china still lifes. Even if you can’t be bothered to jot down “Fall Recipes From Your Family” into the quaintly lined journal pages provided, the recipes here go a step beyond your average vegetable ode and are worth exploring: green beans with frizzled scallions and ginger, butternut squash crostini with raisins and brown butter. It’s not vegetarian and heirloom vegetables are not actually required — for Beekman 1802 is all about the joys of the harvest, minus the backache from weeding and the gritty fingernails. To be used in a spirit of indolence.

Vegetarian for a New Generation

Seasonal Vegetable Dishes for Vegetarians, Vegans, and the Rest of Us
by Liana Krissoff

Paperback, 272 pages
This third offering in Krissoff’s “New Generation” series may look just like any other vegetable book, but don’t be fooled! Once you get past the bland title and tiny print, there are some surprising, wickedly effective flavor combinations just waiting to be discovered. Brussels sprouts waltz through a tamarind-ginger dressing; a tamari-butter glaze clings to potato wedges. Even the kale chip, which everyone agrees has overstayed its welcome, gets an alluring makeover in coconut. Not every recipe shines with newness — there are fine old friends like miso eggplant and butternut squash soup — but Kassoff never lets comfort devolve into boredom.

 

The Better Bean Cookbook

More than 160 Modern Recipes for Beans, Chickpeas, and Lentils to Tempt Meat-eaters and Vegetarians Alike
by Jenny Chandler

Hardcover, 272 pages
Protein-filled, healthy beans — everybody wants to love them, but why do they make it so difficult? Even perfectly cooked beans can exhaust your appetite long before you get to the bottom of the bowl, for the blandness of a bean calls for aggressive seasoning to blast open its beige palette. Here at last is a bean book that’s more tempting than earnest, brimming with cosmopolitan flavors and vivid photography. Forget about your hippie-era three-bean dip and boiled lentils — in these pages, dosas and tagines, falafels and burritos rub shoulders. Some are generously herbed, some are richly spiced, but all deliver novelistic detail on the plate compared to the leguminous one-liners of years past. The right-minded should be warned that this is no vegan — or even vegetarian — compendium. Decadent beanery is afoot in these pages; proceed accordingly.

Simple Thai Food
Classic Recipes from the Thai Home Kitchen
by Leela Punyaratabandhu

Hardcover, 227 pages
I have generally found “Quick,” “Easy,” and “Simple” to be disingenuous labels when it comes to Thai cookbooks. They might be actually easy, but then they’re likely more Chinese than Thai. Or they’re not actually easy at all — just easy compared to the hours you’d spend pounding spice pastes in the old country, with no electricity or running water. But Punyaratabandhu seems to pull it off, coming up with recipes that are weeknight-doable yet electric with ingredients you can just about find if you try hard (dried shrimp, kaffir lime leaf, palm sugar). Shortcuts or not, they’re desperately delicious. And as to those curry pastes? Store-bought is fine, according to the author. But diehard readers will still find complete recipes for each in the back of the book. In other words, you can have it both ways.

FoodBrat’s Cookbook review for Summertime 2014

 

Posted on another Blog…

 Image

Welcome to the Summer Cookbook and Food Book Preview. Here you will find Summer releases (May 1 to August 31) that are about, written by, or could be useful to chefs/restaurants. As usual, Summer is a big season for ice cream books and grilling/barbecue books; but there’s something for everyone among the titles below.

 

First, meat. On the grilling and barbecue front, there’s Los Angeles chef Ben Ford’s guide to massive outdoor feasts, Taming the Feast, and flavormeister Guy Fieri discover fire in his outdoor cookbook Guy on Fire. For a bit more challenging fare, explore charcuterie with either a sausage book from Ryan Farr of San Francisco’s 4505 Meats or NYC/Boston chef Jamie Bissonnette’s new guide to charcuterie. Need to make both the backyard cookout master and the culinary showoff happy? Go for The Meat Hook Meat Book for instructions on making Brooklyn’s finest rooftop ribs and/or country pate.

 

Next, for the more popular books for Summer time reading has been lighter, healthier recipe cookbooks like; Chef Michael Bennett’sAll-Natural SURF CUISINE”. Rounding out Summer’s offerings are a book on the future of food from chef Dan Barber, a baking book from the ex-St John pastry chef Justin Gellatly, a big shiny chef book from Paris two star restaurant Le Cinq, the 40th anniversary reboot of Richard Olney’s classic Simple French Food, and a cocktail book from bartender Jeffrey Morgenthaler of Clyde Common in Portland.

 

As for Summer’s favorite dessert treat – ice cream, Ohio ice creamist Jeni Britton Bauer of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams has a new book out. There are also books from Maine’s Jeff Miller of ScoopBrooklyn Farmacy and Soda Fountain, national food truck Coolhaus ice cream sandwichery, and London’s Ruby Violet.

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

 

 Image

Taming the Feast: Ben Ford’s Field Guide to Adventurous Cooking

Ben Ford and Carolynn Carreño
Chef Ben Ford (The Filling Station, Los Angeles) goes big on this, his first cookbook. The book lays out plans for feasts of mammoth proportions, with everything from a whole hog roast to a north woods lake fish fry to a burger-and-brats block party. The book was co-written by Carolynn Carreño (who worked on the Mozza cookbook as well as the Shopsin’s cookbook) and has photography from Frank Ockenfels III. Check out a preview here.
Atria: May 6; Buy at Amazon

 

All-Natural SURF CUISINE: a study in Seafood cookery

Chef Michael Bennett
Image

You want healthy Summer grilling help? South Florida author and chef Michael Bennett has 100 healthy and Gluten-free Seafood recipes for you. All recipes are Gluten-free and naturally healthy for you — including tuna, escolar, grouper, lobster, yellowtail snapper, swordfish and all-natural sauces and accompaniments that are tied together by photographs that explain the plating techniques. Photography by; The Professional Image.
The Professional Image, Inc.: May 20; Buy at Amazon

 

Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream Desserts

Jeni Britton Bauer
Ohio’s cult favorite ice cream maker Jeni Britton Bauer is back with her second cookbook, and this time she’s expanding beyond the frozen treats that made her famous. Here bakers will find recipes for baked goods to accompany ice cream, from sundae toppings to cobblers to cookies for making ice cream sandwiches. In addition, the book contains 30 recipes for new ice cream flavors including Absinthe & Meringue, Juniper & Lemon Curd, Cumin & Honey Butterscotch, and more.
Artisan: May 20; Buy at Amazon

 

The Meat Hook Meat Book: Buy, Butcher, and Cook Your Way to Better Meat

Tom Mylan
‘Tis the season for cooking meat: in Brooklyn butcher Tom Mylan’s first book he explores meat in all its various forms. Learn everything from a basic braise to grilled ribs to sausage-making to lamb belly porchetta to homemade chicken nuggets, and maybe pick up some creative ways to get really drunk while doing so. It’s what Mylan describes, one assumes with tongue firmly planted in cheek, as a “cool-guy butchering book.”
Artisan: May 20; Buy at Amazon

 

The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food

Dan Barber
For Blue Hill/Blue Hill at Stone Barns chef Dan Barber’s first book, he didn’t go with a big, glossy chef cookbook. Instead, we get a thoughtful, 450-page manifesto on what Barber sees as the future of sustainable food. Drawing on his research at his restaurant in upstate New York and locations farther afield, Barber makes the argument that “America’s cuisine require[s] a radical transformation.”
Penguin Press HC: May 20; Buy at Amazon

 

The New Charcuterie Cookbook: Exceptional Cured Meats to Make and Serve at Home

Jamie Bissonnette
Recent James Beard Award winner and Boston/NYC chef Jamie Bissonnette shares recipes for charcuterie from a variety of traditions, including traditional European, Latin and Middle Eastern-inspired recipes. Photography is by Ken Goodman and the foreword is by Andrew Zimmern.
Page Street Publishing: August 26; Buy at Amazon

 

Also Coming This Spring

  • Dos Caminos Tacos: 100 Recipes for Everyone’s Favorite Mexican Street Food
    by Ivy Stark and Joanna Pruess. Countryman: May 5; Buy at Amazon
  • The Soda Fountain: Floats, Sundaes, Egg Creams & More–Stories and Flavors of an American Original
    by Peter Freeman and Gia Giasullo. Ten Speed: May 6; Buy at Amazon
  • Man Bites Dog: Hot Dog Culture in America
    by Bruce Kraig and Patty Carroll. AltaMira: May 6; Buy at Amazon
  • The New Greenmarket Cookbook: Recipes and Tips from Today’s Finest Chefs—and the Stories behind the Farms That Inspire Them
    by Gabrielle Langholtz. Da Capo: May 27; Buy at Amazon
  • Dumplings All Day Wong: A Cookbook of Asian Delights From a Top Chef
    by Lee Anne Wong. Page Street Publishing: August 19; Buy at Amazon

 

Books Worth Buying: January’s Best Food and Drink Releases

Re-posted from another Blog

Chef Michael Bennett 's Gluten free cookbook makes a list
Foodbrats.com

We get dozens of cookbooks each week at SAVEUR magzine, and every month we share our favorite new releases—books that, through one avenue of greatness or another, have earned a place on our over-stuffed shelves. This time, those books that piqued our interest came from all over the world—the Middle East, Myanmar, Paris, the American South—and covered a variety of recipes, from Gluten Free cooking to Palestinian mezze.

   OLIVES, LEMONS & ZA’ATAR: THE BEST MIDDLE EASTERN HOME COOKING

olives and lemon

by Rawia Bishara
I have long been a fan of Tanoreen, Rawia Bishara’s Palestinian restaurant tucked away in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, where her inventive mezze, like fried Brussels sprouts drizzled with fresh tahini and pomegranate seeds and eggplant napoleons slathered in babaganoush cream, make the forty-five minute trek from Manhattan well worthwhile. So, I was thrilled when I finally got my hands on her cookbook, and the secrets behind the delectable dishes I’d eaten at her restaurant. The recipes for my favorites turned out to be shockingly easy, 5-ingredient affairs, and as I flipped through the pages of mouthwatering photographs and lovely asides about local culinary folklore and her own food memories, I also discovered simplified recipes for many Palestinian classics. For example, her recipe for Musakhan, a complicated festival dish of sumac-rubbed roast chicken served on rounds of fresh-baked taboon bread, is transformed from weekend project to weeknight meal with a simple pizza-like flatbread recipe and smart substitutions like quick sautéed boneless chicken breast. Bishara’s modern, approachable take on classic Palestinian food makes Olives, Lemons, & Za’atar a book I’m glad to have on my shelf as a source for doable, exciting dishes and tried and true favorites that I will be reaching for again and again. —Felicia Campbell

Available February 13 from Kyle Books; $29.95.

IN THE LAND OF MISFITS, PIRATES AND COOKS

 

Gluten free cooking from Chef Michael Bennett
Gluten Free recipes from Chef Michael Bennett

by Chef Michael Bennett
It is akin to cooking and eating with a conscience. Chef Michael Bennett carefully weaves the art of cooking with the science of achieving a healthy body and sane mind. He introduced to his readers an approach in eating that has been inspired by the wisdom of the ages.

As a person who has been making the transition toward a more natural diet, I was naturally drawn to this book. Overall, I would say that it was a helpful book at inspiring readers to eat healthier. I liked the personal introduction that discussed the author’s motivation for writing the book as well. It set the tone of a book as a regular guy who has learned things about Caribbean tropically-inspired healthy cooking while discussing what it is like to travel and work throughout the Caribbean. After reading so many books from “experts”, this was a nice little break. All the Gluten Free recipes like —spiced pecans, crab beignets, silky onion dip, and my favorite, bacon and Parmesan gougères—transformed my kitchen table into a fruit laden maple Butcher’s block sideboard.

The book is just as interesting reading as it is interacting. The author has published this book with interactive QR code links that connect your directly to the Internet’s database of cookery terms and grocery websites where you can find the more rare food novelties.

This book will take you on a 1000 mile journey across the Caribbean in an innovative technological and healthy way.— FoodBrats.com

Available from FoodBrats.com; $35.95

 DOWN SOUTH: BOURBON, PORK, GULF SHRIMP & SECOND HELPINGS OF EVERYTHING

 

Southern vcooking

by Donald Link and Paula Disbrowe
I grew up in the South, and on cold, blustery days in New York, I long for it. The Gulf Coast holds particular charms for me, and whenever I go to New Orleans a visit to one of Donald Link’s restaurants is a must. So when Link’s latest cookbook, Down South, arrived, I grabbed it off the shelf and headed to the liquor store, inviting a few friends over along the way. Oftentimes, cocktails are relegated to the back of cookbooks, ancillary to the “real” stars of the show. In Down South, however, cocktails proudly set the stage for all of the deliciousness to come. Meyer lemon French 75s were my favorite, but the punch from the famous Flora-Bama bar (whose wallop I have felt on a few youthful road trips down the coast) was the crowd pleaser at my house. Following the initial cocktail section of the book, Link takes you inside an “old-school Southern cocktail party” with dishes—spiced pecans, crab beignets, silky onion dip, and my favorite, bacon and Parmesan gougères—that transformed my Brooklyn kitchen table into a groaning Southern sideboard. The rest of the book is just as inviting, and Link’s enthusiasm for the region is palpable. Cooking from this book took me a thousand miles down south and out of the northeastern cold. —Kaylee Hammonds

Available February 25 from Clarkson Potter; $24.63

 UNDER THE SHADE OF OLIVE TREES: RECIPES FROM JERUSALEM TO MARRAKECH AND BEYOND

by Nadia Zerouali & Merijn Tol

This playful romp through Arabia comes from the hosts of a Middle Eastern cooking program in the Netherlands who, through their travels, have come to see the area that stretches from the Mediterranean and North Africa to Iran, as a multicultural tapestry united by an ancient culinary history. In their latest book, Under the Shade of Olive Trees, they incorporate historic dishes such as Iraqimadfuna—a ground lamb-stuffed eggplant dish spiked with rose water that was popular in the Middle Ages—with easy, contemporary riffs on Middle Eastern cuisine, including their two-ingredient tahini-halva ice cream. Informative sidebars provide short histories of ingredients such as sumac and argan oil, along with tips on incorporating them into all manner of cooking. Nadia and Merijn’s inventive energy comes through in recipes like a modified Arabic flatbread, which uses an upside-down wok in place of the traditional rounded metal griddles used by street vendors in Lebanon. They have even included a special section in the back of the book where friends like Kamal Mouzawak, the founder of the first organic market in Lebanon, and Ingmar Neizen, an expert on African cuisine, share their favorite recipes. Though many of the recipes are basic, this book is full of surprises, my favorite of which was Niezen’s Sudanese falafel, a spicy, sesame encrusted version of the ubiquitous Middle Eastern snack served, in her version, with a tart-hot African peanut sauce. This cookbook offers a modern, innovative perspective on an amazing culinary region.—Felicia Campbell

Available March 18 from Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $31.50

   LA MERE BRAZIER: THE MOTHER OF MODERN FRENCH COOKING

by Eugenie Brazier

Simple French fare is my preferred comfort food: an omelet with salad, a slice of pâté, perfectly-executed moules marinières—for me, these simple bites can transform a drab day into something else entirely. My collection of French cookery books has swallowed my bookshelf to the degree that I’ve had to enforce an “only if it’s extraordinary” rule on my purchases, but La Mère Brazier: The Mother of Modern French Cooking is just that. Available in English for the first time this month, La Mère Brazier brings the life, voice, and recipes of an iconic French chef to an Anglophone audience at long last. Paul Bocuse, who apprenticed in Brazier’s kitchen, wrote the highly respectful and nostalgic forward to this book. Care has been taken to retain the historical accuracy of the recipes while making them accessible to modern home cooks. And the stories of Brazier’s rise from farm-hand to fêted, decorated chef—she was the first woman to receive six Michelin stars—is told with such charm and simplicity, and with such emphasis on the humble roots of much of her food, that I could not help but hear her voice as I stood in my kitchen recently, whipping up a batch of her Parisian gnocchi, feeling grateful that there was room on my shelf for at least one more book. —Kaylee Hammonds

Available March 25 from Rizzoli, $24.92

 YUCATÁN: RECIPES FROM A CULINARY EXPEDITION

by David Sterling

Before I picked up this book, I knew little about the Yucatán, apart from what I had read in the story The Queen of Yucatán from our Mexico issue. With that meager knowledge in mind, I approached David Sterling’s tome not without apprehension. The book runs through all the sub-regions of the Yucatán, almost a food-driven road trip in text. And beyond Sterling’s encyclopedic and meticulously-researched knowledge of Yucatecan food, his love for and connection to the region and its fare are evident on every page; it is rare to find such humble passion and vigor in a volume that is so comprehensive and informational. The photographs capture scenes from the streets, food stalls, and home kitchens, as well as landscapes from the region. Nothing feels staged; the images of the recipes are mouth-watering, yet homey, imperfect, and entirely in tune with the rest of the book.

The recipes, too, are surprisingly accessible. On a snowy night in New York City, I set out to make Ajiaca, a deeply garlicky stew with a strong orange color. After roasting six heads of garlic and squeezing out the slightly sweet, liquified cloves, I started adding vegetables to a stock pot. By the end of a long stew, large hunks of pork tore apart under the tines of my fork. An entire diced potato had disintegrated into the stew, giving it a comforting thickness and satisfying texture. I spooned out bowls of pork and vegetables, topped them with the orange broth, and finished with plantains I had twice fried into tostones, putting together a bowl of the Yucatán. I couldn’t imagine eating anything better on a cold winter night. —Oliver Erteman

Available March 30 from University of Texas Press, $40.65

 LODGE CAST IRON NATION: GREAT AMERICAN COOKING FROM COAST TO COAST

By The Lodge Company

It was my mother-in-law—an exemplary cook—who gifted me with a Lodge cast iron skillet when I was just a newlywed. That was a decade ago, and it’s since been U-Hauled across the country and moved in and out of countless New York City apartments. But no matter how tiny the stove (and there have been some Easy Bake Oven-style varieties in past kitchens), I always find a home for my trusty skillet on the back left burner. In Cast Iron Nation, Lodge celebrates the deep ties Americans have to this well-seasoned cookware, with recipes that span the nation. A few classics make an appearance: center-cut, bone-in pork chops that become sweet with a quick sear; a buttermilk-brined fried chicken; and a handful of trusty cornbreads, cooked in the vessel that gives the requisite cracking crust. But there are plenty of rather sophisticated recipes represented here, too, and I fell hard for the squash bisque with mascarpone and apple-cheese crostini. I could never have imagined making soup in my skillet, yet the flavors roast and melt down to a wintery perfection. The North Carolina clam chowder, a warm-your-belly kind of dish, ditches the thick base, and allows plump clams to steal the thunder. Since I’ve found this cookbook, now thoroughly dog-eared, it seems that my beloved skillet has made its way to the front burner on a near-daily basis. —Anne Roderique-Jones

Available March 18 from Oxmoor House, $25
Buy Lodge Cast Iron Nation: Great American Cooking from Coast to Coast

 SLICES OF LIFE: A FOOD WRITER COOKS THROUGH MANY A CONUNDRUM

by Leah Eskin

For charm, you can’t beat Leah Eskin’s memoir and cookbook, Slices of Life (Running Press, 2014). The long-time SAVEUR contributor and Chicago Tribune columnist brings an irreverent humor, cool precision, and gustatory gusto to her accounts of American family life. Each small, resonant moment is occasion to cook something delicious: a child’s obsession with dinosaurs leads to batches of stegosaurus-shaped pumpkin muffins; an audiophile husband’s grudging surrender of the aubergine-colored mega-speakers that hogged the living room inspires a bout of eggplant cookery; a sulking pre-teen gets Mom’s love in the form of an Asian chicken salad. So much domesticity necessarily inspires nostalgia, but Eskin is such a versatile cook that such reveries offer pithy surprises: college memories come attached to a recipe for lobster rolls; tax day merits its own dessert, an almond and popcorn brittle. Readers with a more categorical sensibility might be disconcerted by Eskin’s haphazard organization—ice cream recipes up against a granola recipe up against a tarragon chicken recipe—but the book simply mirrors life, which is brimming with episodes either happy or sad but always punctuated by a meal. —Betsy Andrews

Books Worth Buying: January’s Best Food and Drink Releases

Chef Michael Bennett 's Gluten free cookbook makes a list
Foodbrats.com
  • This has been re-posted from another BLOG.

We get dozens of cookbooks each week at SAVEUR magzine, and every month we share our favorite new releases—books that, through one avenue of greatness or another, have earned a place on our over-stuffed shelves. This time, those books that piqued our interest came from all over the world—the Middle East, Myanmar, Paris, the American South—and covered a variety of recipes, from Gluten Free cooking to Palestinian mezze.

olives and lemon

OLIVES, LEMONS & ZA’ATAR: THE BEST MIDDLE EASTERN HOME COOKING
by Rawia Bishara
I have long been a fan of Tanoreen, Rawia Bishara’s Palestinian restaurant tucked away in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, where her inventive mezze, like fried Brussels sprouts drizzled with fresh tahini and pomegranate seeds and eggplant napoleons slathered in babaganoush cream, make the forty-five minute trek from Manhattan well worthwhile. So, I was thrilled when I finally got my hands on her cookbook, and the secrets behind the delectable dishes I’d eaten at her restaurant. The recipes for my favorites turned out to be shockingly easy, 5-ingredient affairs, and as I flipped through the pages of mouthwatering photographs and lovely asides about local culinary folklore and her own food memories, I also discovered simplified recipes for many Palestinian classics. For example, her recipe for Musakhan, a complicated festival dish of sumac-rubbed roast chicken served on rounds of fresh-baked taboon bread, is transformed from weekend project to weeknight meal with a simple pizza-like flatbread recipe and smart substitutions like quick sautéed boneless chicken breast. Bishara’s modern, approachable take on classic Palestinian food makes Olives, Lemons, & Za’atar a book I’m glad to have on my shelf as a source for doable, exciting dishes and tried and true favorites that I will be reaching for again and again. —Felicia Campbell

Available February 13 from Kyle Books; $29.95.

Foodbrats.com announces: America's First Gluten-Free Caribbean-Influenced Cookbook That is Also QR Code-Enhanced | Foodbrats.com's Press Release | a href="default.aspx" style="text-decoration:none; color:white;" Home & Garden/abr /br /br / Press Release

IN THE LAND OF MISFITS, PIRATES AND COOKS
by Chef Michael Bennett
It is akin to cooking and eating with a conscience. Chef Michael Bennett carefully weaves the art of cooking with the science of achieving a healthy body and sane mind. He introduced to his readers an approach in eating that has been inspired by the wisdom of the ages.
As a person who has been making the transition toward a more natural diet, I was naturally drawn to this book. Overall, I would say that it was a helpful book at inspiring readers to eat healthier. I liked the personal introduction that discussed the author’s motivation for writing the book as well. It set the tone of a book as a regular guy who has learned things about Caribbean tropically-inspired healthy cooking while discussing what it is like to travel and work throughout the Caribbean. After reading so many books from “experts”, this was a nice little break. All the Gluten Free recipes like —spiced pecans, crab beignets, silky onion dip, and my favorite, bacon and Parmesan gougères—transformed my kitchen table into a fruit laden maple Butcher’s block sideboard.
The book is just as interesting reading as it is interacting. The author has published this book with interactive QR code links that connect your directly to the Internet’s database of cookery terms and grocery websites where you can find the more rare food novelties.
This book will take you on a 1000 mile journey across the Caribbean in an innovative technological and healthy way.— FoodBrats.com

Available from FoodBrats.com; $35.95

DOWN SOUTH: BOURBON, PORK, GULF SHRIMP & SECOND HELPINGS OF EVERYTHING
by Donald Link and Paula Disbrowe
I grew up in the South, and on cold, blustery days in New York, I long for it. The Gulf Coast holds particular charms for me, and whenever I go to New Orleans a visit to one of Donald Link’s restaurants is a must. So when Link’s latest cookbook, Down South, arrived, I grabbed it off the shelf and headed to the liquor store, inviting a few friends over along the way. Oftentimes, cocktails are relegated to the back of cookbooks, ancillary to the “real” stars of the show. In Down South, however, cocktails proudly set the stage for all of the deliciousness to come. Meyer lemon French 75s were my favorite, but the punch from the famous Flora-Bama bar (whose wallop I have felt on a few youthful road trips down the coast) was the crowd pleaser at my house. Following the initial cocktail section of the book, Link takes you inside an “old-school Southern cocktail party” with dishes—spiced pecans, crab beignets, silky onion dip, and my favorite, bacon and Parmesan gougères—that transformed my Brooklyn kitchen table into a groaning Southern sideboard. The rest of the book is just as inviting, and Link’s enthusiasm for the region is palpable. Cooking from this book took me a thousand miles down south and out of the northeastern cold. —Kaylee Hammonds

Available February 25 from Clarkson Potter; $24.63

UNDER THE SHADE OF OLIVE TREES: RECIPES FROM JERUSALEM TO MARRAKECH AND BEYOND
by Nadia Zerouali & Merijn Tol

This playful romp through Arabia comes from the hosts of a Middle Eastern cooking program in the Netherlands who, through their travels, have come to see the area that stretches from the Mediterranean and North Africa to Iran, as a multicultural tapestry united by an ancient culinary history. In their latest book, Under the Shade of Olive Trees, they incorporate historic dishes such as Iraqimadfuna—a ground lamb-stuffed eggplant dish spiked with rose water that was popular in the Middle Ages—with easy, contemporary riffs on Middle Eastern cuisine, including their two-ingredient tahini-halva ice cream. Informative sidebars provide short histories of ingredients such as sumac and argan oil, along with tips on incorporating them into all manner of cooking. Nadia and Merijn’s inventive energy comes through in recipes like a modified Arabic flatbread, which uses an upside-down wok in place of the traditional rounded metal griddles used by street vendors in Lebanon. They have even included a special section in the back of the book where friends like Kamal Mouzawak, the founder of the first organic market in Lebanon, and Ingmar Neizen, an expert on African cuisine, share their favorite recipes. Though many of the recipes are basic, this book is full of surprises, my favorite of which was Niezen’s Sudanese falafel, a spicy, sesame encrusted version of the ubiquitous Middle Eastern snack served, in her version, with a tart-hot African peanut sauce. This cookbook offers a modern, innovative perspective on an amazing culinary region.—Felicia Campbell

Available March 18 from Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $31.50

LA MERE BRAZIER: THE MOTHER OF MODERN FRENCH COOKING
by Eugenie Brazier

Simple French fare is my preferred comfort food: an omelet with salad, a slice of pâté, perfectly-executed moules marinières—for me, these simple bites can transform a drab day into something else entirely. My collection of French cookery books has swallowed my bookshelf to the degree that I’ve had to enforce an “only if it’s extraordinary” rule on my purchases, but La Mère Brazier: The Mother of Modern French Cooking is just that. Available in English for the first time this month, La Mère Brazier brings the life, voice, and recipes of an iconic French chef to an Anglophone audience at long last. Paul Bocuse, who apprenticed in Brazier’s kitchen, wrote the highly respectful and nostalgic forward to this book. Care has been taken to retain the historical accuracy of the recipes while making them accessible to modern home cooks. And the stories of Brazier’s rise from farm-hand to fêted, decorated chef—she was the first woman to receive six Michelin stars—is told with such charm and simplicity, and with such emphasis on the humble roots of much of her food, that I could not help but hear her voice as I stood in my kitchen recently, whipping up a batch of her Parisian gnocchi, feeling grateful that there was room on my shelf for at least one more book. —Kaylee Hammonds

Available March 25 from Rizzoli, $24.92

YUCATÁN: RECIPES FROM A CULINARY EXPEDITION
by David Sterling

Before I picked up this book, I knew little about the Yucatán, apart from what I had read in the story The Queen of Yucatán from our Mexico issue. With that meager knowledge in mind, I approached David Sterling’s tome not without apprehension. The book runs through all the sub-regions of the Yucatán, almost a food-driven road trip in text. And beyond Sterling’s encyclopedic and meticulously-researched knowledge of Yucatecan food, his love for and connection to the region and its fare are evident on every page; it is rare to find such humble passion and vigor in a volume that is so comprehensive and informational. The photographs capture scenes from the streets, food stalls, and home kitchens, as well as landscapes from the region. Nothing feels staged; the images of the recipes are mouth-watering, yet homey, imperfect, and entirely in tune with the rest of the book.

The recipes, too, are surprisingly accessible. On a snowy night in New York City, I set out to make Ajiaca, a deeply garlicky stew with a strong orange color. After roasting six heads of garlic and squeezing out the slightly sweet, liquified cloves, I started adding vegetables to a stock pot. By the end of a long stew, large hunks of pork tore apart under the tines of my fork. An entire diced potato had disintegrated into the stew, giving it a comforting thickness and satisfying texture. I spooned out bowls of pork and vegetables, topped them with the orange broth, and finished with plantains I had twice fried into tostones, putting together a bowl of the Yucatán. I couldn’t imagine eating anything better on a cold winter night. —Oliver Erteman

Available March 30 from University of Texas Press, $40.65

LODGE CAST IRON NATION: GREAT AMERICAN COOKING FROM COAST TO COAST
By The Lodge Company

It was my mother-in-law—an exemplary cook—who gifted me with a Lodge cast iron skillet when I was just a newlywed. That was a decade ago, and it’s since been U-Hauled across the country and moved in and out of countless New York City apartments. But no matter how tiny the stove (and there have been some Easy Bake Oven-style varieties in past kitchens), I always find a home for my trusty skillet on the back left burner. In Cast Iron Nation, Lodge celebrates the deep ties Americans have to this well-seasoned cookware, with recipes that span the nation. A few classics make an appearance: center-cut, bone-in pork chops that become sweet with a quick sear; a buttermilk-brined fried chicken; and a handful of trusty cornbreads, cooked in the vessel that gives the requisite cracking crust. But there are plenty of rather sophisticated recipes represented here, too, and I fell hard for the squash bisque with mascarpone and apple-cheese crostini. I could never have imagined making soup in my skillet, yet the flavors roast and melt down to a wintery perfection. The North Carolina clam chowder, a warm-your-belly kind of dish, ditches the thick base, and allows plump clams to steal the thunder. Since I’ve found this cookbook, now thoroughly dog-eared, it seems that my beloved skillet has made its way to the front burner on a near-daily basis. —Anne Roderique-Jones

Available March 18 from Oxmoor House, $25
Buy Lodge Cast Iron Nation: Great American Cooking from Coast to Coast

SLICES OF LIFE: A FOOD WRITER COOKS THROUGH MANY A CONUNDRUM
by Leah Eskin

For charm, you can’t beat Leah Eskin’s memoir and cookbook, Slices of Life (Running Press, 2014). The long-time SAVEUR contributor and Chicago Tribune columnist brings an irreverent humor, cool precision, and gustatory gusto to her accounts of American family life. Each small, resonant moment is occasion to cook something delicious: a child’s obsession with dinosaurs leads to batches of stegosaurus-shaped pumpkin muffins; an audiophile husband’s grudging surrender of the aubergine-colored mega-speakers that hogged the living room inspires a bout of eggplant cookery; a sulking pre-teen gets Mom’s love in the form of an Asian chicken salad. So much domesticity necessarily inspires nostalgia, but Eskin is such a versatile cook that such reveries offer pithy surprises: college memories come attached to a recipe for lobster rolls; tax day merits its own dessert, an almond and popcorn brittle. Readers with a more categorical sensibility might be disconcerted by Eskin’s haphazard organization—ice cream recipes up against a granola recipe up against a tarragon chicken recipe—but the book simply mirrors life, which is brimming with episodes either happy or sad but always punctuated by a meal. —Betsy Andrews

Chef Michael Bennett, a Miami-based Gluten-Free cookbook Author, is now consulting for Gourmet Markets.

For Immediate Release
FoodBrats.com
November 29st, 2011
Miami, Florida

Miami, Fl. | November 29th, 2011 ~ FoodBrats.com announces that our chief Author member, Chef Michael Bennett has changed career objectives and is now pursuing what he considers an idyllic Gluten-Free culinary arena, Gourmet Markets. Since his time conducting healthy Spa Cuisine based menu expansion in Miami’s Epicure Gourmet Market on South Beach, Chef Michael Bennett always wanted to get back to the console of only utilization the best ingredients to generate a superlative healthy-lifestyle cuisine.

He has developed and extended his Gluten Free culinary consultancy responsibilities among two different companies. One located in the Caribbean, on Grand Cayman (Wine Down Gourmet Market – opening next month) and opening on Valentine’s Day, 2012 – Harvest Market and Café in the upwardly classic neighborhood of Belleair Bluffs on Florida’s West Coast. After Chef Michael Bennett three year reshaping of the culinary remnant from the 1990’s – Bimini Boatyard, (BBY) he is now undertaking the development of specialized Gourmet Markets.

Chef Michael Bennett endorses his previous culinary posts – via the Social Media universe with his Gluten-Free cookbook “In the Land of Misfits, Pirates and Cooks”. It is the first of three cookbooks that he penned for FoodBrats.com albeit being the distinctly recuperative soul at the resuscitated BBY dinosaur. This past year after releasing his third cookbook, Chef Michael Bennett honed his predominately Caribbean-inspired cookbook’s recipes to be 100 percent Gluten-Free. Chef Michael Bennett’s 180 + page | four color | 125 + Gluten-free recipe cookbook was rewritten with an emphasis on America’s newest dining trend. His healthy Gluten-Free recipes capture the distinct Miami flavor of a multi-national Caribbean cookery heritage, while keeping recipes vigorously vibrant gluten-free taste profile. Powerful photography, exclusive design, one-of-a-kind recipe flow, helpful sidebars and QR (Quick Response) codes blend to create the perfect sampling of what this Gluten-Free Caribbean based cookery style has to offer. The QR codes link you directly to the Internet so your interactive experience is as fun as it is informative.

Chef Bio:
Michael Bennett, born in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. to first generation Floridians, has spent most of his adult life in the food and hospitality industry. Michael’s grandfather was the family’s first restaurateur, operating a few South Florida restaurants after emigrating here from Ohio in the 1940’s. He earned critical culinary kudos as the Executive chef for the 26 year, culinary tour d’ force – Left Bank restaurant in Fort Lauderdale. Under his auspices he brought Left Bank it’s first ever “Best of” (Zagat Survey), “Four Stars” (AAA) and “Four Diamonds” (Mobil) to their 20 plus year era of three star ratings. He is affiliatted with several culinary and food-related organizations. Chef Michael regularly lectures on South Florida’s “Caribb-ican” cuisine.
Chef Michael Bennett is considering this somewhat of a homecoming because he started cooking at a seafood restaurant on Florida’s West Coast while still attending college. He then transferred to the Culinary Institute of America to pursue his true professional passion. After leaving the CIA and for the next 11 years, Michael’s life revolved around intense periods of kitchen management followed by months of O.J.T. under the tutelage from Miami’s most important and well-known chefs. During this time he sought out the most exotic and chic dining network to hone his craft.
Chef Michael Bennett is a well-known, award winning (Chef of the Year-1995) Florida chef whose clients are a Who’s Who of Media and Sports personalities. Some of his clientèle comprise celebrities from the entertainment and sport industries including; Wilt Chamberlin, Roger Stubb, Oprah, Jayda and Will Smith, Patrick Stewart, Andy Rooney, Michael Caine, Daryl Hanna, George Hamilton, Walter Cronkie, Morgan Freeman, Elton John, Snopp Dog, Madonna, Trina, Beyonce and others…..

About FoodBrats.com
FoodBrats.com was founded in 1991 and as a “budding” Chef | Author PR services provider for chefs and soon to be authors. FoodBrats.com helps Chefs and Authors publish food related articles and their own books on a regional basis. FoodBrats.com provides Chefs | Authors with direct and personal access to quick, quality orientated publication in trade paperback, custom leather-bound, and full-color formats.

Contact us for more information at
Email: foodbrat@gmail.com
Or; 305-851-3441

###

Chef Michael Bennett’s dish for New Times-Pairings 2010.

For Immediate Release

Contact: Michael Bennett
Bimini Boatyard
1555 17th street Cswy.
Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33306
954-525-7400

Chef Michael Bennett’s dish for
New Times-Pairings 2010.

Fresh Ingredients and Tropical Flavors are deliciously
absorbed in a Value-Endorsed State of Mind

“Food and Cooking has been my entire life…

making it a value just seems right!” ~Chef Michael Bennett

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, September 2010 – The Bimini Boatyard (BBY) was first usher into the Fort Lauderdale dining scene scape in September of 1989. A lot has happened in the world since the time of its opening. Remember the fall of the Berlin Wall? The reins of this lengthy journey have been taken on by chef and cookbook author-Michael Bennett, once acknowledged by the American Culinary Federation as Chef of the Year -1995.
Today the BBY is best-known for its exciting and wildly popular “Caribb-ican” menu, value-based wines and the best Happy Hour in Fort Lauderdale. Like BBY’s menu, the wine list selections are globally sourced, chosen for their value price point and a complementary taste when paired with our menu. United with our casual-style of service – that is straight from the heart – referring to a sense of caring and friendliness, it is the combination of good food and this almost neighbor-like service that has invigorated this 21 year landmark.

Chef Michael is participating in the Pairings event this year and he gives us this recipe to post so all will be familiar with the dish before they get a chance to try in on September 16th, 2010.

My recipe for the New Times-“Pairings” event 2010

  • Event will take place on September 16th, 2010 – in Fort Lauderdale.
  • Chef Michael will be showcasing a fabulous recipe made from WHITE tuna.
  • It is prepared in a new – “Old World” style.
  • As chef Michael Bennett mixes in the classic French cookery methodologies with Caribbean and Asian elements – to form a new classic cooking method that is transformed by the use of an un-likely pairing of ingredients.

For more recipes and information about chef Michael Bennett’s cookbooks, goto:

http://www.foodbrats.com

***

Escolar

Red-Curry and Beurre Noisette Mop

served with Plantain and Pineapple

8 portions

*** White Tuna – being extremely rich – should only be eaten in smaller portion sizes.
5 oz. Is all you’ll need to be satisfied.

Ingredients:

First part of the recipe
Caribbean Sweet-Spice:

Pink Peppercorns 3 Tbs.
Green Peppercorns 1 Tbs.
Mustard powder ½ teas.
Ginger powder ½ teas.
Seasalt 1 Tbs.
Mrs. Dash 1 Tbs.
Curry Powder ½ teas.
Poultry spice ½ teas.
Cayenne pepper pinch
Paprika 2 Tbs.
Mace pinch
Nutmeg pinch
Garlic, granulated 1 teas.
Onion, granulated 1 teas.

2nd part of the recipe: the Mop
Butter ½ lb.
Red Curry paste 2 Tbs.
Triple Sec liquor 1 teas.
Brandy 1 teas.
Sesame oil 2 oz.
Salt and pepper 1 teas. (4 to 1 ratio-salt to pepper)
Honey 4 oz.

Escolar 8 (5oz. fillets about 1 ½ inch thick)

First part of recipe – directions:
Place all spice ingredients in a coffee bean grinder and pulse into powder.
Use this powder to sprinkle – heavily onto the fish – before grilling.

2nd part of recipe directions:
First: you are going to make the sauce, then glaze the fish as it cooks on a grill.
Mop/Sauce:
Place the butter in an already hot – heavy bottom pan to speed the butter’s browning. Stir while the butter starts to cook. Continue to stir as the pan heats the butter and you will notice the butter starting to turn a brownish color. At this point add the red curry, watch for boiling. The curry spices will hasten the browning of the butter. Then, as the color deepens in brownish tint, add the CAREFULLY rest of the ingredients.
Carefully add the liquor to the glaze because there is a chance that the mix will be too hot and boil up rapidly and over flow on the stove.
Finish with adding the honey last. Cool the glaze.
Next – Season with the Caribbean Sweet-Spice blend and cook the fillets of Escolar over the grey coals of a well-oiled grill grates. Mark-the fillets, that is sear on the grates (about two minutes) and then flip and cook 1 minute more. Then move over to the cooler parts of the grill and cover so the heat of the coals work to heat the fish like an oven. Cook about 5 minutes more per inch of fillet thickness.
As you are cooking over the grey coals, lightly brush with the mop. Flip over and mop again. Move the fillet, mop again, close lid, cook and mop once again. Finish cooking and mop once more. Place on a warm platter until ready to serve. There will be some juices that flow out.
To plate, Make the next part of the recipe. Place the melange in the center of the plate and set the cooked fish fillet atop and mop with a little more sauce and let it roll down onto the plate.

NOTE:
Using a 3 inch round ring mold, fill with the plantain melange and push down onto the mixture to form a compressed circle of plantain. Lift the mold to remove, leaving a perfect circle on the plate where the fillet can rest easily.

Garnish with a small salad of arugula, sunsprouts and citrus sections or, just a little micro greens.

Paired with a special combination of tropical food elements;

Plantain and Pineapple

enough for eight portions

Ingredients:
Plantains, greenish-yellow 3 each
Pineapple pieces 1 small can (about 5 oz.)
Red Bell pepper, diced 1 each
Cilantro, chopped well 4 bunch
Seasalt ½ Tbs.
Oil As needed

Directions:
Heat 1/2 quart of oil in a deep pot to 350 degrees.

Clean the plantains. This is done by making a slit into the plantain with a small pairing knife along the ridges of the banana-like veggie. Remove the skin, then dice the plantain into 3/8 – 1/2 inch size diced.
Fry the plantain-about 2 minutes so they are no longer raw. Then remove from oil and drain. Season with salt.
In another saute pan, saute the diced peppers in a small amount of oil. Toss in the drained plantains, then the pineapple and then cilantro. Toss in the pan to mix the melange. Season again with the Seasalt. Remove and then place in the center of the plate. Place the fish fillet over top.

For more recipes and information about chef Michael Bennett’s cookbooks, goto:

http://www.foodbrats.com