Chef Michael Bennett’s dish for New Times-Pairings 2010.

For Immediate Release

Contact: Michael Bennett
Bimini Boatyard
1555 17th street Cswy.
Fort Lauderdale, Fl. 33306
954-525-7400

Chef Michael Bennett’s dish for
New Times-Pairings 2010.

Fresh Ingredients and Tropical Flavors are deliciously
absorbed in a Value-Endorsed State of Mind

“Food and Cooking has been my entire life…

making it a value just seems right!” ~Chef Michael Bennett

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, September 2010 – The Bimini Boatyard (BBY) was first usher into the Fort Lauderdale dining scene scape in September of 1989. A lot has happened in the world since the time of its opening. Remember the fall of the Berlin Wall? The reins of this lengthy journey have been taken on by chef and cookbook author-Michael Bennett, once acknowledged by the American Culinary Federation as Chef of the Year -1995.
Today the BBY is best-known for its exciting and wildly popular “Caribb-ican” menu, value-based wines and the best Happy Hour in Fort Lauderdale. Like BBY’s menu, the wine list selections are globally sourced, chosen for their value price point and a complementary taste when paired with our menu. United with our casual-style of service – that is straight from the heart – referring to a sense of caring and friendliness, it is the combination of good food and this almost neighbor-like service that has invigorated this 21 year landmark.

Chef Michael is participating in the Pairings event this year and he gives us this recipe to post so all will be familiar with the dish before they get a chance to try in on September 16th, 2010.

My recipe for the New Times-“Pairings” event 2010

  • Event will take place on September 16th, 2010 – in Fort Lauderdale.
  • Chef Michael will be showcasing a fabulous recipe made from WHITE tuna.
  • It is prepared in a new – “Old World” style.
  • As chef Michael Bennett mixes in the classic French cookery methodologies with Caribbean and Asian elements – to form a new classic cooking method that is transformed by the use of an un-likely pairing of ingredients.

For more recipes and information about chef Michael Bennett’s cookbooks, goto:

http://www.foodbrats.com

***

Escolar

Red-Curry and Beurre Noisette Mop

served with Plantain and Pineapple

8 portions

*** White Tuna – being extremely rich – should only be eaten in smaller portion sizes.
5 oz. Is all you’ll need to be satisfied.

Ingredients:

First part of the recipe
Caribbean Sweet-Spice:

Pink Peppercorns 3 Tbs.
Green Peppercorns 1 Tbs.
Mustard powder ½ teas.
Ginger powder ½ teas.
Seasalt 1 Tbs.
Mrs. Dash 1 Tbs.
Curry Powder ½ teas.
Poultry spice ½ teas.
Cayenne pepper pinch
Paprika 2 Tbs.
Mace pinch
Nutmeg pinch
Garlic, granulated 1 teas.
Onion, granulated 1 teas.

2nd part of the recipe: the Mop
Butter ½ lb.
Red Curry paste 2 Tbs.
Triple Sec liquor 1 teas.
Brandy 1 teas.
Sesame oil 2 oz.
Salt and pepper 1 teas. (4 to 1 ratio-salt to pepper)
Honey 4 oz.

Escolar 8 (5oz. fillets about 1 ½ inch thick)

First part of recipe – directions:
Place all spice ingredients in a coffee bean grinder and pulse into powder.
Use this powder to sprinkle – heavily onto the fish – before grilling.

2nd part of recipe directions:
First: you are going to make the sauce, then glaze the fish as it cooks on a grill.
Mop/Sauce:
Place the butter in an already hot – heavy bottom pan to speed the butter’s browning. Stir while the butter starts to cook. Continue to stir as the pan heats the butter and you will notice the butter starting to turn a brownish color. At this point add the red curry, watch for boiling. The curry spices will hasten the browning of the butter. Then, as the color deepens in brownish tint, add the CAREFULLY rest of the ingredients.
Carefully add the liquor to the glaze because there is a chance that the mix will be too hot and boil up rapidly and over flow on the stove.
Finish with adding the honey last. Cool the glaze.
Next – Season with the Caribbean Sweet-Spice blend and cook the fillets of Escolar over the grey coals of a well-oiled grill grates. Mark-the fillets, that is sear on the grates (about two minutes) and then flip and cook 1 minute more. Then move over to the cooler parts of the grill and cover so the heat of the coals work to heat the fish like an oven. Cook about 5 minutes more per inch of fillet thickness.
As you are cooking over the grey coals, lightly brush with the mop. Flip over and mop again. Move the fillet, mop again, close lid, cook and mop once again. Finish cooking and mop once more. Place on a warm platter until ready to serve. There will be some juices that flow out.
To plate, Make the next part of the recipe. Place the melange in the center of the plate and set the cooked fish fillet atop and mop with a little more sauce and let it roll down onto the plate.

NOTE:
Using a 3 inch round ring mold, fill with the plantain melange and push down onto the mixture to form a compressed circle of plantain. Lift the mold to remove, leaving a perfect circle on the plate where the fillet can rest easily.

Garnish with a small salad of arugula, sunsprouts and citrus sections or, just a little micro greens.

Paired with a special combination of tropical food elements;

Plantain and Pineapple

enough for eight portions

Ingredients:
Plantains, greenish-yellow 3 each
Pineapple pieces 1 small can (about 5 oz.)
Red Bell pepper, diced 1 each
Cilantro, chopped well 4 bunch
Seasalt ½ Tbs.
Oil As needed

Directions:
Heat 1/2 quart of oil in a deep pot to 350 degrees.

Clean the plantains. This is done by making a slit into the plantain with a small pairing knife along the ridges of the banana-like veggie. Remove the skin, then dice the plantain into 3/8 – 1/2 inch size diced.
Fry the plantain-about 2 minutes so they are no longer raw. Then remove from oil and drain. Season with salt.
In another saute pan, saute the diced peppers in a small amount of oil. Toss in the drained plantains, then the pineapple and then cilantro. Toss in the pan to mix the melange. Season again with the Seasalt. Remove and then place in the center of the plate. Place the fish fillet over top.

For more recipes and information about chef Michael Bennett’s cookbooks, goto:

http://www.foodbrats.com

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Working in the Caribbean…

My dreams were realized.

I was finally in the Caribbean working in the place where I thought I belonged. It was rough at first being there without the family and the government making it even harder to bring them here.

In the British Caribbean, working isn’t a problem as long as you can grease the palm of the local municipalities. They do make it hard to bring your family in, because they can’t charge (tax) you for this right.

Although I was in the governmental offices three times a week, up to three hours a day, I waited and waited. It was extremely long time before my children of 11 and 14 to be accepted into a school system, that was a year behind the local South Florida schools, but evently after four months they were. Too late to finish the school year correctly, so they finished their classes online and went back to South Florida to graduate.

The daily problem was to get them to a computer terminal to do the class work-online. I eventually had to bring them toi a coffee shop downtown, because we lived remotely atop a mountain without many common services like cable, and telephone. So after finding the limited signal bandwidth and then having to pay the shop keeper for the use of electricity, they finally had a place to do school work. On this island electricity is desil generated and very costly. Most on the island can not afford air conditioning their homes.

Just so you know, it s a beautiful place, but the daily challenge in living like people in the U.S. – taking for granted of a strong TV signal, or cell phone signal/connections, cheap electric costs to run air conditioners or just a continuous stream of electricity into the home started to wear on all of us.

It is a beautiful place if you want to relax and watch the colors of blue change every second.

The Island where we lived was mountainous. We lived on top on of the small ones. The airplanes daily flew beneath our home to land at the only airstrip for this country. Living atop the mountain was great, for sightseeing, but not convenience. We call going shopping for grocerys – provisioning. And it is what it sounds like. Going down the mountain, and traveling into town is an adventure.

We were use to walking across the street and having a Winn-Dixie and Publix within 600 yards from our condo in Aventura (Miami). Going to go on this adventure is stressful as well. The mountain roads are not large enough for two full size truck to pass each other without one coming very close to dropping from the side of the mountain’s edge.
Con’t. later…..
Things you take for granted.
Happy ThanksGiving